INLAIN   20354
INSTITUTO DE LACTOLOGIA INDUSTRIAL
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
artículos
Título:
Two strains of nonstarter lactobacilli increased the production of flavor compounds in soft cheeses
Autor/es:
MILESI, M.MERCEDES; WOLF, I.VERĂ“NICA; BERGAMINI, CARINA V.; HYNES, ERICA R.
Revista:
JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE
Editorial:
AMER DAIRY SCIENCE ASSOC-ADSA
Referencias:
Año: 2010 vol. 93 p. 5020 - 5020
ISSN:
0022-0302
Resumen:
The contribution to flavor generation and secondary proteolysis of 2 strains of mesophilic lactobacilli isolated from cheese was studied. Miniature soft cheeses (200 g) were produced with or without the inclusion of a culture of Lactobacillus plantarum I91 or Lactobacillus casei I90 in the starter composed of Streptococcus thermophilus. During ripening, cheeses containing the added lactobacilli showed an increased content of total free amino acids, but this increase was only significant in cheeses with Lb. plantarum I91. In addition, free amino acid profiles were modified by selective increases of some amino acids, such as Asp, Ser, Arg, Leu, and Phe. Cheeses inoculated with Lb. plantarum I91 or Lb. casei I90 were also characterized by a significantly higher concentration of diacetyl, a key flavor compound, and an increased content of acetoin. Results suggest an increase in the catabolism of either citrate or aspartate, with the production of the derived aroma compounds. Overall, aspartate content increased in both lactobacilli-added cheeses, whereas citrate was more or less constant, suggesting that aspartate could be the source of increased diacetyl and acetoin. A triangle aroma test showed that the addition of the lactobacilli strains significantly changed the sensory attributes of cheeses. At least 11 of 12 panelists commented that the aroma of cheeses with adjuncts was more buttery than that of control cheeses, which is desirable in most soft cheeses. Both Lb. plantarum I91 and Lb. casei I90 performed well as adjunct cultures by influencing cheese aroma development and cheese proteolysis. Lactobacillus plantarum I91 or Lactobacillus casei I90 in the starter composed of Streptococcus thermophilus. During ripening, cheeses containing the added lactobacilli showed an increased content of total free amino acids, but this increase was only significant in cheeses with Lb. plantarum I91. In addition, free amino acid profiles were modified by selective increases of some amino acids, such as Asp, Ser, Arg, Leu, and Phe. Cheeses inoculated with Lb. plantarum I91 or Lb. casei I90 were also characterized by a significantly higher concentration of diacetyl, a key flavor compound, and an increased content of acetoin. Results suggest an increase in the catabolism of either citrate or aspartate, with the production of the derived aroma compounds. Overall, aspartate content increased in both lactobacilli-added cheeses, whereas citrate was more or less constant, suggesting that aspartate could be the source of increased diacetyl and acetoin. A triangle aroma test showed that the addition of the lactobacilli strains significantly changed the sensory attributes of cheeses. At least 11 of 12 panelists commented that the aroma of cheeses with adjuncts was more buttery than that of control cheeses, which is desirable in most soft cheeses. Both Lb. plantarum I91 and Lb. casei I90 performed well as adjunct cultures by influencing cheese aroma development and cheese proteolysis.