MACNBR   00242
MUSEO ARGENTINO DE CIENCIAS NATURALES "BERNARDINO RIVADAVIA"
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
artículos
Título:
Complex palaeosol ichnofabrics from Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous volcaniclastic successions from Patagonia, Argentina.
Autor/es:
BEDATOU, E., MELCHOR, R.N. Y GENISE, J.F.
Revista:
SEDIMENTARY GEOLOGY
Editorial:
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Referencias:
Lugar: Amsterdam; Año: 2009 vol. 218 p. 74 - 74
ISSN:
0037-0738
Resumen:
Late Jurassic–Early Cretaceous volcaniclastic continental deposits from central Patagonia, Argentina were analyzed for an integral characterization of palaeosol ichnofabrics. These units contain complex continental ichnofabrics that were also recorded in other late Jurassic–late Miocene extended volcaniclastic successions from Patagonia. According to a recently proposed method, ichnofabric, pedofabric and original bedding of selected intervals were measured separately in order to determinate the degree in which the deposits are affected by soil features besides the ichnofabrics. Four recurrent ichnofabrics were recognized in studied palaeosols: the Loloichnus, large Taenidium–Beaconites, diffuse boxwork, and Dagnichnus ichnofabrics. The Loloichnus ichnofabric is characterized by sub-vertical Loloichnus baqueroensis and subordinate, similarly arrenged large Taenidium barretti and Beaconites coronus. L. baqueroensis is a crayfish dwelling structure while large T. barretti and B. coronus are assigned to locomotion of the same organisms. Root traces are additional components of this ichnofabric. The large Taenidium–Beaconites ichnofabric is formed by large, irregular and curved T. barretti and B. coronus and by L. baqueroensis in low proportion. This ichnofabric is also assigned to crayfish activity. The diffuse boxwork ichnofabric is characterized by a pervasive and intricate three-dimensional boxwork of burrows; occasionally joined to subspherical chambers (possible Castrichnus). The diffuse boxwork is interpreted as an earthworm burrow system and the associated chambers are probably for aestivation. Rare and scattered discrete trace fossils in this ichnofabric include L. baqueroensis, T. barretti and B. coronus. The Dagnichnus ichnofabric is formed by Dagnichnus titoi, root traces and, subordinately, Loloichnus baqueroensis, Cellicalichnus meniscatus and tangled groups of meniscate burrows. D. titoi and C. meniscatus has been interpreted as crayfish breeding structures and the tangled groups of meniscate burrows are probably related to juvenile crayfish activity. The studied ichnofabrics were formed in weakly to moderately developed palaeosols in lowland areas with frequent reworking of pyroclastic material by unconfined flows. The recognized ichnofabrics show that in Patagonia, for the Late Jurassic–Early Cretaceous times, crayfishes and earthworms were the dominant soil organisms and, along with plants, rapidly colonized deposits exposed subaerially. After sediment deposition and with high soil moisture content or high water table crayfishes probably crawled in moist sediments forming the large Taenidium–Beaconites ichnofabric. With a better drained soil profile or lower water tables, the Loloichnus ichnofabric, representing the dwelling structures of adult crayfishes, overprinted the previous ichnofabric. The diffuse boxwork ichnofabric, usually located in the uppermost portion of palaeosols, correspond to extensive fossil earthworm burrow systems. The Dagnichnus ichnofabric occurs in very weakly developed palaeosols and probably reflects the optimal palaeoenvironmental conditions for breeding crayfish.–Early Cretaceous volcaniclastic continental deposits from central Patagonia, Argentina were analyzed for an integral characterization of palaeosol ichnofabrics. These units contain complex continental ichnofabrics that were also recorded in other late Jurassic–late Miocene extended volcaniclastic successions from Patagonia. According to a recently proposed method, ichnofabric, pedofabric and original bedding of selected intervals were measured separately in order to determinate the degree in which the deposits are affected by soil features besides the ichnofabrics. Four recurrent ichnofabrics were recognized in studied palaeosols: the Loloichnus, large Taenidium–Beaconites, diffuse boxwork, and Dagnichnus ichnofabrics. The Loloichnus ichnofabric is characterized by sub-vertical Loloichnus baqueroensis and subordinate, similarly arrenged large Taenidium barretti and Beaconites coronus. L. baqueroensis is a crayfish dwelling structure while large T. barretti and B. coronus are assigned to locomotion of the same organisms. Root traces are additional components of this ichnofabric. The large Taenidium–Beaconites ichnofabric is formed by large, irregular and curved T. barretti and B. coronus and by L. baqueroensis in low proportion. This ichnofabric is also assigned to crayfish activity. The diffuse boxwork ichnofabric is characterized by a pervasive and intricate three-dimensional boxwork of burrows; occasionally joined to subspherical chambers (possible Castrichnus). The diffuse boxwork is interpreted as an earthworm burrow system and the associated chambers are probably for aestivation. Rare and scattered discrete trace fossils in this ichnofabric include L. baqueroensis, T. barretti and B. coronus. The Dagnichnus ichnofabric is formed by Dagnichnus titoi, root traces and, subordinately, Loloichnus baqueroensis, Cellicalichnus meniscatus and tangled groups of meniscate burrows. D. titoi and C. meniscatus has been interpreted as crayfish breeding structures and the tangled groups of meniscate burrows are probably related to juvenile crayfish activity. The studied ichnofabrics were formed in weakly to moderately developed palaeosols in lowland areas with frequent reworking of pyroclastic material by unconfined flows. The recognized ichnofabrics show that in Patagonia, for the Late Jurassic–Early Cretaceous times, crayfishes and earthworms were the dominant soil organisms and, along with plants, rapidly colonized deposits exposed subaerially. After sediment deposition and with high soil moisture content or high water table crayfishes probably crawled in moist sediments forming the large Taenidium–Beaconites ichnofabric. With a better drained soil profile or lower water tables, the Loloichnus ichnofabric, representing the dwelling structures of adult crayfishes, overprinted the previous ichnofabric. The diffuse boxwork ichnofabric, usually located in the uppermost portion of palaeosols, correspond to extensive fossil earthworm burrow systems. The Dagnichnus ichnofabric occurs in very weakly developed palaeosols and probably reflects the optimal palaeoenvironmental conditions for breeding crayfish.