MACNBR   00242
MUSEO ARGENTINO DE CIENCIAS NATURALES "BERNARDINO RIVADAVIA"
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
artículos
Título:
Control measures for a recent invasion of Hieracium pilosella in Southern Patagonian rangelands
Autor/es:
CIPRIOTTI, P.A.; RAUBER, R.B.; COLLANTES, M.B.; BRAUN, K.; ESCARTIN, C.
Revista:
WEED RESEARCH
Editorial:
WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC
Referencias:
Lugar: Londres; Año: 2011 vol. 52 p. 98 - 98
ISSN:
0043-1737
Resumen:
Plant invasions have important economical impact on biodiversity, the functioning of ecosystems and economic sustainability. In this study, we evaluated the effects of four control measures (pasture sown plus fertiliser, fertiliser and selective or non selective herbicide applications) in two different grazing conditions (grazed and ungrazed) during a recent invasion of the exotic herb Hieracium pilosella in northern grasslands of Tierra del Fuego Island in Southern Patagonia, Argentina. As response variables, we measures the cover the invasive species, the dominant growth forms of other plant species, litter and bare soil at patch scales (m2) during two consecutive growing seasons. The effects of fertilisation depended on the grazing conditions: H. pilosella cover decresed by more than 92 porcent and was replaced by dicotyledonous herbs in the ungrased or fertilised subplots, while it exhibited no decrese in the grazed or fertiliser subplots after the second growing season. Both herbicides (selective and no selective) reduce H. pilosella cover by 63 porcent compared with the untreated subplots independently of grazing. However, the non selective herbicide application resulted in an increase in bare soil and litter cover in the treated grazed and ungrazed subplots respectively. In contrast, such effects were not observed with the selective broad leaved herbicide application. A control strategy based on the local application of selective herbicides and or NP fertilisers, in conjunction with  transient ban on sheep grazing, reduce the invader cover in the short term and at a local scale and also reduced the cover of bare soil through the restoration of native vegetation. An economic assessment of this strategy supported the profitability of these control measures.