INVESTIGADORES
LAVARIAS Sabrina Maria Luisa
artículos
Título:
EFFECT OF THE WATER-SOLUBLE FRACTION OF PETROLEUM ON MICROSOMAL LIPID METABOLISM OF Machrobrachium borellii (ARTHROPODA: CRUSTACEA)
Autor/es:
LAVARIAS, SABRINA MARIA LUISA; GARC√ćA, FERNANDO; POLLERO, RICARDO J.; HERAS, HERAS
Revista:
AQUATIC TOXICOLOGY
Editorial:
Elsevier
Referencias:
Lugar: Amsterdan; Año: 2007 vol. 82 p. 265 - 271
ISSN:
0166-445X
Resumen:
The effect of thewater-soluble fraction of crude oil (WSF) on lipid metabolismwas studied at critical metabolic points, namely fatty acid activation, enzymes of triacylglycerol and phospholipid synthesis, and membrane (lipid packing) properties in the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium borellii. To determine the effect of the contaminant, adults and embryos at different stages of development were exposed to a sublethal concentration of WSF for 7 days. After exposure, microsomal palmitoyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) showed a two-fold increase in adult midgut gland. Embryo?s ACS activity was also affected, the increment being correlated with the developing stage. Endoplasmic reticulum acylglycerol synthesis was also increased by WSF exposure in adults and stage 5 embryos, but not at earlier stages of development. Triacylglycerol synthesis was particularly increased (18.5%) in adult midgut gland. The microsomal membrane properties were studied by fluorescent steady-state anisotropy, using the rotational behavior of the fluorescent probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). Microsomes from midgut gland of WSF-exposed prawn showed no differences in fluidity. Nevertheless, microsomes incubated with WSF in vitro increased their fluidity in a temperature- and WSF concentration-dependent fashion. Both, aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons individually tested elicited an increase in membrane fluidity at 10 mg/l, but at 4 mg/l only nC10?C16 aliphatics did. In vivo results indicate that WSF increased the activity of microsomal enzymes that are critical in lipid metabolism, though this change was not due to direct alterations in membrane fluidity, suggesting a synthesis induction, or an enzyme-regulatory mechanism. Nevertheless, hydrocarbons elicited membrane fluidity alterations in in vitro experiments at concentrations that could be found in the environment after an oil spill.