INVESTIGADORES
SOUTO Cintia Paola
artículos
Título:
Recovering Native Culture in a World of Nonnative Species
Autor/es:
SPEZIALE, K.; LAMBERTUCCI, S.; C. P. SOUTO; HIRALDO, F.
Revista:
CONSERVATION BIOLOGY
Editorial:
WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC
Referencias:
Lugar: Londres; Año: 2015 vol. 28 p. 1129 - 1129
ISSN:
0888-8892
Resumen:
Traditionally, native species have been the main source of food and shelter for humans. However, this drastically changed from the eras of colonization onwards (Crosby 2004). Diasporic people took familiar species with them both as a resource and to maintain their culture in the colonized environments (Pfeiffer & Voeks 2008). This practice produced a shift towards the continuous use of non-native species, which increased their cultural valuation and led them to be considered local resources (Nuñez et al. 2012; Speziale et al. 2012). Currently, the increasing demand for products by highly consumptive societies exacerbates the production and use of non-native species (Myers & Kent 2004). Human consumption of invasive species is commonly advised for controlling them (e.g. Collier et al. 2011). Thus, non-native invasive species control can become a profitable activity (Collier et al. 2011) triggering their social valuation and even their protection (Carruthers et al. 2011; Speziale et al. 2012). So harvesting non-native species can lead to a dangerous dilemma: whether to design a control project or maintain healthy populations of this economic resource (Lambertucci & Speziale 2011). Here we first describe the problems of valuing non-native species. Then, we propose an alternative of increasing the cultural and economic value of native species through their sustainable use.
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