INVESTIGADORES
GARCIA adolfo Martin
congresos y reuniones científicas
Título:
The Impact of Translation Competence on Bilingual Lexical Processing: Evidence from Word Reading and Word Translation
Autor/es:
GARCÍA, ADOLFO M.; IBÁÑEZ, AGUSTÍN; HUEPE, DAVID; CHÁVEZ, SILVANA G.; HOUCK, ALEXANDER LEE; MICHON, MAËVA; GERLOMINI, CARLOS; CHADHA, SUMEER; RIVERA-REI, ÁLVARO
Lugar:
British Columbia, Vancouver
Reunión:
Conferencia; 41 LACUS Conference; 2014
Institución organizadora:
University of British Columbia
Resumen:
A major experimental paradigm to tap the organization of the bilingual lexicon is single-word translation. Evidence obtained through this task has been crucial for the development of leading models in the field ?e.g., the Revised Hierarchical Model (Kroll & Stewart 1994) and the Bilingual Interactive Activation+ Model (Dijkstra & van Heuven 2002). Several studies have shown that word translation processes are modulated by L2 proficiency and lexical variables, such as concreteness and cognate status (for reviews, see Brysbaert & Duyck 2010; French & Jacquet 2004; Kroll et al. 2010). However, the impact of translation competence on this domain remains virtually unexplored. The present psycholinguistic study seeks to examine this issue. The experiment included three groups of Spanish-English bilinguals: 12 beginner translation students (BEG), 12 advanced translation students (ADV), and 12 professional translators (PRO). Participants were instructed to read nouns in L1 and L2, and to translate them in backward (L2-L1) and forward (L1-L2) direction, as fast and accurately as possible. Within and across languages, stimuli were controlled for length, frequency, concreteness, and cognate status. Valid data were log transformed to make them amenable to parametric analysis. Within each participant, log reaction times (RTs) were averaged for each combination of task, cognate status, and concreteness. Those averages were analyzed using a four-way mixed-model ANOVA including a between-subject factor with three levels of translation competence (level: BEG, ADV, PRO) and three within-subject factors with different levels: task (L1 reading, L2 reading, backward translation, forward translation), cognate status (cognate, non-cognate), and concreteness (abstract, concrete). The Tukey a posteriori test was used to examine the pairwise comparison for significant ANOVAs. RTs showed that, in word reading, concreteness and cognate status effects were absent in all groups (all (ps > .05). On the contrary, as regards word translation, concrete words were processed significantly faster than abstract words (F (3, 99) = 9.37, p < .001), and cognates were processed faster than non-cognates (F (3, 99) = 141.42, p < .001). Finally, the strengthening of links induced by translation competence was more marked in the early than in the late stages of training and practice. A Tukey?s HSD test (MSe = .111, df = 33) revealed shorter RTs in ADV (p = .041) and PRO (p = .032) relative to BEG, whereas ADV and PRO did not differ from each other (p > .05). These results suggest that, in addition to L2 proficiency, studies on bilingual memory organization should also control for their participants? translation competence.