INVESTIGADORES
DE ANGELO Carlos Daniel
artículos
Título:
Camera trap photographic rates on roads vs. off roads: location does matter
Autor/es:
DI BITETTI, MARIO; PAVIOLO, AGUSTÍN; DE ANGELO, CARLOS
Revista:
MASTOZOOLOGí­A NEOTROPICAL
Editorial:
UNIDAD DE ZOOLOGÍA Y ECOLOGÍA ANIMAL, INSTITUTO ARGENTINO DE INVESTIGACIÓN DE LAS ZONAS ARIDAS, CRICYT, CONICET
Referencias:
Lugar: Mendoza; Año: 2014 vol. 21 p. 37 - 37
ISSN:
0327-9383
Resumen:
We present the results of a camera trap survey conducted in 2008 in the Atlantic Forest of Iguazú National Park, Argentina, testing whether placing camera traps on dirt roads/ trails or in off-road locations produce important biases in the recorded species. Seven pairs of camera trap stations were active for 26.6 ± 8.9 days; for each pair, one station was located on a narrow unpaved road and the other about 50 m from the road. We used the first order Jackknife estimator to compare species richness between on-road vs. off-road locations. We used records from another camera trap survey conducted at Iguazú National Park in 2006-2007 to assess whether species with a high Road-use Index (ratio of photographs of animals walking along roads to photographs of animals crossing the roads) had a higher ratio of records on roads / off road stations in the 2008 survey. Multivariate ANOVA based on dissimilarities (ADONIS) was used to compare mammal assemblages recorded at stations located on roads vs. off roads. We obtained 228 independent records of 15 species of medium-large sized terrestrial mammals. Stations located on roads had a higher recording rate (1.06, SD=0.57 vs. 0.24, SD=0.13 records per day) and recorded more species than off-road stations (15 vs. 10 recorded species; 19.3, SE=2.8 vs. 14.3, SE=2.8 species estimated with the 1st order Jackknife model). Species differ in their relative probabilities of being recorded on roads vs. off roads, something that can be predicted with the Road-use Index. The ADONIS indicated that the mammal assemblage surveyed on roads was statistically dissimilar to that surveyed off roads, a result that can be explained by the differential tendency of the species to use roads and trails.