IRNASUS   26003
INSTITUTO DE INVESTIGACIONES EN RECURSOS NATURALES Y SUSTENTABILIDAD JOSE SANCHEZ LABRADOR S.J.
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
congresos y reuniones científicas
Título:
Spatial Metabolomics visualizes the chemical interaction between Bacillus subtilis and the corn rhizosphere
Autor/es:
JEREMIAH MINICH; ROB KNIGHT; ANDREA G. ALBARRAC├ŹN ORIO; PIETER C. DORRESTEIN; DANIEL PETRAS; GARRETT J. LEPINE
Lugar:
Olympic Valley, California, USA
Reunión:
Simposio; Keystone Symposia: Natural Products and Synthetic Biology: Parts and Pathways (J1); 2018
Resumen:
Plants are one of the main players in global carbon fixation and our primary food and energy source. Understanding them and their interactions with the environment thoroughly is therefore of high importance for humans. In particular, the growth promoting and protective properties of plant-associated microorganisms are of great interest for modern agriculture. To study plant-microbe interactions, advances in nucleotide sequencing techniques as well as in protein and metabolite analysis offer a systematic description at a molecular level. With modern microscopic techniques, in vivo hybridization probes and imaging mass spectrometry, we can now add a spatial level, typically in the micrometer-to-centimeter range. In this study, we developed a 3D plant imaging approach, combining optical and magnet resonance imaging with non-targeted tandem mass spectrometry and amplicon 16S and ITS DNA sequencing of prokaryotes and fungi, respectively. We applied this approach to study the interaction of the corn plant rhizosphere with Bacillus subtilis. Thereby, we could show alterations in the rhizosphere linked to secondary metabolites produced by Bacillus. Abundance of lipopeptides, such as surfactins correlate thereby not only to changes in the microbial community but also to the community production of secondary metabolites. These compounds include several depsipeptides, some of which are known phytotoxins, and provide direct molecular insights in the mode of action of plant protection through B. subtilis. Besides, the identification and correlation of known compounds, our non-targeted analysis highlighted several unknown compounds and putative analogs, revealing a mainly unexplored chemical space of the rhizosphere. This study shows the high potential of a non-targeted workflow, providing high sensitivity and selectivity for the molecular imaging of plant -microbe interaction, which can basically be applied to any other plant or microbial system