INVESTIGADORES
SCHLEICH Cristian Eric
capítulos de libros
Título:
Sensory Ecology of Subterranean Rodents
Autor/es:
BEGALL, S.; SCHLEICH, C.E.
Libro:
Subterranean Rodents: News from Underground
Editorial:
Springer-Verlag
Referencias:
Año: 2007; p. 81 - 84
Resumen:
Ever since Dusenbery’s seminal monograph published in 1992, sensory ecology has been defined as the study of how organisms acquire and respond to information. Hence, in contrast to classical ecology with its focus on energy flows, sensory ecology dealswith information flows (Dusenbery 1992). Since this information is closely linked to the animal’s environment, sensory ecology tries to find answers to the question of how the animal interacts with its environment. On the one hand, the animal’s environment consists of the physical properties of its habitat, and on the other hand it also implies the interactionswith other animals. In the case of subterranean mammals, the ecotope is dark, rather monotonous and harsh in comparison to the situation found above the ground (Burda et al., this volume). These differences between the underground and aboveground ecotopes led early scientists workingwith subterranean mammals to speculate about the sensory equipment of their study objects (Eloff 1951, 1958; Crawford 1966; Quilliam 1966; Poduschka 1978). A first review of studies on sensory adaptations in subterranean rodents conducted until the late 1980s is given by Burda et al. (1990a). interacts with its environment. On the one hand, the animal’s environment consists of the physical properties of its habitat, and on the other hand it also implies the interactionswith other animals. In the case of subterranean mammals, the ecotope is dark, rather monotonous and harsh in comparison to the situation found above the ground (Burda et al., this volume). These differences between the underground and aboveground ecotopes led early scientists workingwith subterranean mammals to speculate about the sensory equipment of their study objects (Eloff 1951, 1958; Crawford 1966; Quilliam 1966; Poduschka 1978). A first review of studies on sensory adaptations in subterranean rodents conducted until the late 1980s is given by Burda et al. (1990a). 1992). Since this information is closely linked to the animal’s environment, sensory ecology tries to find answers to the question of how the animal interacts with its environment. On the one hand, the animal’s environment consists of the physical properties of its habitat, and on the other hand it also implies the interactionswith other animals. In the case of subterranean mammals, the ecotope is dark, rather monotonous and harsh in comparison to the situation found above the ground (Burda et al., this volume). These differences between the underground and aboveground ecotopes led early scientists workingwith subterranean mammals to speculate about the sensory equipment of their study objects (Eloff 1951, 1958; Crawford 1966; Quilliam 1966; Poduschka 1978). A first review of studies on sensory adaptations in subterranean rodents conducted until the late 1980s is given by Burda et al. (1990a). interacts with its environment. On the one hand, the animal’s environment consists of the physical properties of its habitat, and on the other hand it also implies the interactionswith other animals. In the case of subterranean mammals, the ecotope is dark, rather monotonous and harsh in comparison to the situation found above the ground (Burda et al., this volume). These differences between the underground and aboveground ecotopes led early scientists workingwith subterranean mammals to speculate about the sensory equipment of their study objects (Eloff 1951, 1958; Crawford 1966; Quilliam 1966; Poduschka 1978). A first review of studies on sensory adaptations in subterranean rodents conducted until the late 1980s is given by Burda et al. (1990a). energy flows, sensory ecology dealswith information flows (Dusenbery 1992). Since this information is closely linked to the animal’s environment, sensory ecology tries to find answers to the question of how the animal interacts with its environment. On the one hand, the animal’s environment consists of the physical properties of its habitat, and on the other hand it also implies the interactionswith other animals. In the case of subterranean mammals, the ecotope is dark, rather monotonous and harsh in comparison to the situation found above the ground (Burda et al., this volume). These differences between the underground and aboveground ecotopes led early scientists workingwith subterranean mammals to speculate about the sensory equipment of their study objects (Eloff 1951, 1958; Crawford 1966; Quilliam 1966; Poduschka 1978). A first review of studies on sensory adaptations in subterranean rodents conducted until the late 1980s is given by Burda et al. (1990a). interacts with its environment. On the one hand, the animal’s environment consists of the physical properties of its habitat, and on the other hand it also implies the interactionswith other animals. In the case of subterranean mammals, the ecotope is dark, rather monotonous and harsh in comparison to the situation found above the ground (Burda et al., this volume). These differences between the underground and aboveground ecotopes led early scientists workingwith subterranean mammals to speculate about the sensory equipment of their study objects (Eloff 1951, 1958; Crawford 1966; Quilliam 1966; Poduschka 1978). A first review of studies on sensory adaptations in subterranean rodents conducted until the late 1980s is given by Burda et al. (1990a). how the animal interacts with its environment. On the one hand, the animal’s environment consists of the physical properties of its habitat, and on the other hand it also implies the interactionswith other animals. In the case of subterranean mammals, the ecotope is dark, rather monotonous and harsh in comparison to the situation found above the ground (Burda et al., this volume). These differences between the underground and aboveground ecotopes led early scientists workingwith subterranean mammals to speculate about the sensory equipment of their study objects (Eloff 1951, 1958; Crawford 1966; Quilliam 1966; Poduschka 1978). A first review of studies on sensory adaptations in subterranean rodents conducted until the late 1980s is given by Burda et al. (1990a).
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