INVESTIGADORES
SCHLEICH Cristian Eric
artículos
Título:
Morpho-functional parameters of the inner ear in Ctenomys talarum; Rodentia, Ctenomyidae
Autor/es:
SCHLEICH, C.E.; BEGALL, S.; BURDA, H.
Revista:
Folia Zoologica
Editorial:
Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
Referencias:
Lugar: Checoslovaquia; Año: 2006 vol. 55 p. 264 - 264
ISSN:
0139-7893
Resumen:
We studied the inner ear of Ctenomys talarum, a small solitary subterranean rodent distributed in the southern region of Buenos Aires Province (Argentina) using standard staining techniques. The inner ear of this subterranean rodent is characterized by a long basilar membrane, a higher density of cochlear receptors in the apical region of the basilar membrane and a gradual increment of the width of the triad of outer hair cells from the base towards the apex. These anatomical features of the cochlea of C. talarum can be interpreted as biomechanical specializations to enhance low-frequency sound reception. specializations to enhance low-frequency sound reception. rodent distributed in the southern region of Buenos Aires Province (Argentina) using standard staining techniques. The inner ear of this subterranean rodent is characterized by a long basilar membrane, a higher density of cochlear receptors in the apical region of the basilar membrane and a gradual increment of the width of the triad of outer hair cells from the base towards the apex. These anatomical features of the cochlea of C. talarum can be interpreted as biomechanical specializations to enhance low-frequency sound reception. specializations to enhance low-frequency sound reception. Ctenomys talarum, a small solitary subterranean rodent distributed in the southern region of Buenos Aires Province (Argentina) using standard staining techniques. The inner ear of this subterranean rodent is characterized by a long basilar membrane, a higher density of cochlear receptors in the apical region of the basilar membrane and a gradual increment of the width of the triad of outer hair cells from the base towards the apex. These anatomical features of the cochlea of C. talarum can be interpreted as biomechanical specializations to enhance low-frequency sound reception. specializations to enhance low-frequency sound reception. C. talarum can be interpreted as biomechanical specializations to enhance low-frequency sound reception.