IANIGLA   20881
INSTITUTO ARGENTINO DE NIVOLOGIA, GLACIOLOGIA Y CIENCIAS AMBIENTALES
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
artículos
Título:
Phenotypic plasticity of the coarse root system of Prosopis flexuosa, a phreatophyte tree, in the Monte Desert (Argentina)
Autor/es:
GUEVARA, A.; GIORDANO, C.; ARANIBAR, J.; QUIROGA, M.; VILLAGRA, P.E.
Revista:
PLANT AND SOIL
Editorial:
SPRINGER
Referencias:
Año: 2010 vol. 330 p. 447 - 447
ISSN:
0032-079X
Resumen:
 Prosopis flexuosa trees in the Monte Desert grow in dune and inter-dune valleys, where the water table is located at 6–14 m depth. We asked whether trees in the dunes, which are less likely to access the water table, present a coarse surface root architecture that might favor the exploration / exploitation of dune resources, compensating for water table inaccessibility. We characterized the architecture of surface roots of valley and dune trees, together with the soil environment. The dune held 50 % less and deeper gravimetric soil water (along a 4 m profile), 3-times less organic matter, 2-times less available phosphorous, and a sharper contrast of ammonium and nitrate concentration between plant canopies and uncovered soil than  the valley. Coarse surface roots of dune trees were highly branched and grew tortuously at 0.56±0.16 m depth before sinking downward near the tree crown, suggesting an intensive exploitation of the ephemeral, deep, and canopy-linked resources. In contrast, trees from the valley spread their profuse and less branched surface roots mainly horizontally at 0.26±0.08 m depth, several meters outside the crown probably exploring this resource-rich site. A model for the environmental control of root architecture together with potential ecological effects is discussed.Prosopis flexuosa trees in the Monte Desert grow in dune and inter-dune valleys, where the water table is located at 6–14 m depth. We asked whether trees in the dunes, which are less likely to access the water table, present a coarse surface root architecture that might favor the exploration / exploitation of dune resources, compensating for water table inaccessibility. We characterized the architecture of surface roots of valley and dune trees, together with the soil environment. The dune held 50 % less and deeper gravimetric soil water (along a 4 m profile), 3-times less organic matter, 2-times less available phosphorous, and a sharper contrast of ammonium and nitrate concentration between plant canopies and uncovered soil than  the valley. Coarse surface roots of dune trees were highly branched and grew tortuously at 0.56±0.16 m depth before sinking downward near the tree crown, suggesting an intensive exploitation of the ephemeral, deep, and canopy-linked resources. In contrast, trees from the valley spread their profuse and less branched surface roots mainly horizontally at 0.26±0.08 m depth, several meters outside the crown probably exploring this resource-rich site. A model for the environmental control of root architecture together with potential ecological effects is discussed.