INVESTIGADORES
LENCINAS Maria Vanessa
artículos
Título:
Survival and growth of Nothofagus pumilio seedlings under several microenvironments after variable retention harvesting in southern Patagonian forests
Autor/es:
MART├ŹNEZ PASTUR, G; SOLER, R; CELLINI, JM; LENCINAS, MV; PERI, P; NEYLAND, M
Revista:
ANNALS OF FOREST SCIENCE (PRINT)
Editorial:
EDP SCIENCES S A
Referencias:
Lugar: Paris; Año: 2014 vol. 71 p. 349 - 349
ISSN:
1286-4560
Resumen:
Context Variable retention prescriptions forNothofaguspumilioforestsallows forbiodiversity conservation and natural regeneration by canopy opening. Harvesting generates different microenvironments which present dissimilar conditions for seedling establishment, due to positive or negative influencesover biotic and abiotic factors. AimsThis study evaluate seedling survival and performance at different microenvironment within the harvested stands. Tested hypotheses stated that seedling stress and performance were influenced by harvesting due to changes in forest structure, microclimate, soil properties and nutrient availability. MethodsIn the harvested stands by variable retention, five contrasting microenvironments were selected as treatments for the experiments. Environmental variables were related to eco-physiological and seedling survival and performance. ResultsRemnantoverstorey modifies microclimate through rainfall and solar radiation interception, and consequently influences seedling stress and performance. Harvesting also modifies soil properties (e.g., soil bulk density) and coarse woody debris accumulation which influences soil moisture and/or solar radiation levels.The analyses showed that seedlings obtained benefits of microenvironment variations after harvesting. Providing the full range of microenvironments in the post-harvesting stand will increase chance of achieving successful regeneration. ConclusionsTheproportion of different microenvironments in harvested forests will determineearly regeneration survival and performance. Among analysed microenvironments, covered areas with middle or fine woody debris presented regeneration with better eco-physiological response and seedling performance, although dispersed retention areas (far away from remnant trees) and roads could also present suitable conditions for seedling survival and performance.