INVESTIGADORES
OLIVERI Maria Beatriz
congresos y reuniones científicas
Título:
Calcium and vitamin D nutritional status during pregnancy
Autor/es:
B. OLIVERI; M PARISI; LÓPEZ L; G. BRITO; S. ZENI; C FERNANDEZ
Lugar:
Denver - Colorado -
Reunión:
Congreso; 31th Anual Meeting ASBMR; 2009
Institución organizadora:
ASBMR
Resumen:
Studies performed at our laboratory showed subjects of different age groups and livingin different geographical regions of Argentina to have a deficit in calcium intake andlow vitamin D levels.Few studies have assessed vitamin D and calcium nutritional status in pregnant women.The aim of our study was to assess calcium and vitamin D nutritional status and mineralmetabolism of healthy pregnant women in their third trimester of pregnancy, andestablish whether this status is affected by socioeconomic level, skin pigmentation, timespent outdoors and vitamin D intake.The study comprised 133 healthy pregnant women in their third trimester of pregnancy,aged (X±ES) 26±0.5 years, seen for pregnancy check-up at municipal hospitals in theCity of Buenos Aires (latitude 34° south) between September 2006 and March 2008.Clinical records were filled in, interviews and questionnaires were used to evaluatenutrition, socioeconomic level, and time spent outdoors, and biochemicaldeterminations of serum 25OHD, Calcemia (sCa), Crosslaps(CTX), and Bone alkalinephosphatase (BAP) were performed.Calcium intake was 843.7±52.0mg/day and vitamin D intake was 4.6±0.4 ug/day;intakes were below the recommended dose in 67 and 64% of the populationrespectively.Serum 25OHD levels were in the insufficiency range (20.3±0.8 ng/ml): < 30ng/ml in77% and < 10 ng/ml in 8% of the population. Thirteen of the 133 pregnant women hadhypocalcemia.Comparison of 25OHD levels according to socioeconomic level, skin pigmentation, andvitamin D intake showed no significant differences among subjects.25OHD values were significantly higher in summer-fall than in winter-spring (22.4± 9.7vs 18.4±8.5 ng/ml p<0.05).Pregnant women whose calcium intake was < 1000 mg/d had significantly higher CTXlevels than those whose calcium intake was > 1000 mg/d (650±315 vs 546±327 ng/ml,respectively, p<0.05)A large percentage of pregnant women showed low calcium intake associated withgreater bone resorption and inadequate 25OHD levels. They must be monitored andeventually given supplementation. Because both, the fetus and the newly-born infant,depend on maternal 25OHD status, the observed gestational deficiency might affectearly skeletal development, neonatal bone health, and even bone mass acquisition
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