ILPLA   05424
INSTITUTO DE LIMNOLOGIA "DR. RAUL A. RINGUELET"
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
artículos
Título:
FURTHER STUDIES ON THE POTENTIAL CONTRIBUTION OF ACETALDEHYDE ACCUMULATION AND OXIDATIVE STRESS IN RAT MAMMARY TISSUE IN THE ALCOHOL DRINKING PROMOTION OF BREAST CANCER
Autor/es:
FANELL SL; MACIEL ME,; DIAZ GOMEZ MI; LAYÑO DE DELGADO AMA; BIETTO FM; CASTRO JA; CASTRO GD
Revista:
JOURNAL OF APPLIED TOXICOLOGY
Editorial:
JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD
Referencias:
Lugar: Oxford; Año: 2011 vol. 31 p. 11 - 11
ISSN:
0260-437X
Resumen:
There is available evidence supporting a positive association between alcohol intake and risk of breast cancer. However, there is limited information regarding possible mechanisms for this effect. Past studies from our laboratory suggest that acetaldehyde accumulation in mammary tissue after alcohol intake may be of particular relevance and that cytosolic and microsomal in situ bioactivation of ethanol to acetaldehyde and free radicals and the resulting stimulation of oxidative stress could be a significant early event related to tumor promotion. In the present studies repetitive alcohol drinking for 28 days was found to produce significant decreases in the mammary tissue content of GSH and alpha tocopherol and in glutathione S-transferase or glutathione reductase activities. In contrast, glutathione peroxidase activity was slightly increased. Malondialdehyde determinations did not evidence occurrence of lipid peroxidation while xylenol orange procedure gave positive results. Mammary microsomal metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde was not induced after an acute dose of ethanol or acetone able to induce the activity of its liver counterpart. Cytosolic pathway of alcohol metabolism instead was significantly enhanced by these two treatments. No increased generation of Comet images was found in either mammary tissue or in liver under the experimental conditions tested. Results suggest that while acetaldehyde accumulation in mammary tissue could be a critical event resulting from increasing production of acetaldehyde in situ plus an additional amount of it arriving via blood, other factors such as poor handling of the accumulated acetaldehyde could be also relevant.