CINDECA   05422
CENTRO DE INVESTIGACION Y DESARROLLO EN CIENCIAS APLICADAS "DR. JORGE J. RONCO"
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
artículos
Título:
Encapsulation of valproic acid and sodic phenytoine in ordered mesoporous SiO2 solids for the treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy
Autor/es:
T. LÓPEZ; E. I. BASALDELLA; J. MANJARREZ; M.L. OJEDA,; R. ALEXANDER-KATZ
Revista:
OPTICAL MATERIALS
Editorial:
Elsevier
Referencias:
Año: 2006 vol. 29 p. 75 - 75
ISSN:
0925-3467
Resumen:
Abstract Temporal lobe epilepsy is one of the most frequent types of human neurological diseases, and a variety of surgical procedures have been developed for the treatment of intractable cases. An alternative is the use of drug-containing reservoirs based on nanostructured materials of controlled pore sizes in order to deliver the drug without causing secondary effects. Ordered SiO2 nanostructures were developed as drug reservoirs. The latter were prepared by the sol–gel process using tetraethyl orthosilicate TEOS as precursor to form the ‘‘sol’’ and P123 surfactant as the organic structure-directing agent. In addition to the nontoxic nature of amorphous silica, uniform and tunable pore sizes between 2.5 and 30 nm can be obtained in this way. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of these materials for the storage and release of drugs in the brain. For that, we loaded valproic acid (VH) and sodic phenytoin (PH) molecules into an ordered mesoporous SiO2 by impregnation and characterized the drug impregnated SiO2 by standard physical and spectroscopic techniques to identify the parameters necessary to improve the capacity and quality of the reservoirs. Finally, a study of neurohistopathology of the effects of these reservoirs on brain tissue is presented. techniques to identify the parameters necessary to improve the capacity and quality of the reservoirs. Finally, a study of neurohistopathology of the effects of these reservoirs on brain tissue is presented. techniques to identify the parameters necessary to improve the capacity and quality of the reservoirs. Finally, a study of neurohistopathology of the effects of these reservoirs on brain tissue is presented. as drug reservoirs. The latter were prepared by the sol–gel process using tetraethyl orthosilicate TEOS as precursor to form the ‘‘sol’’ and P123 surfactant as the organic structure-directing agent. In addition to the nontoxic nature of amorphous silica, uniform and tunable pore sizes between 2.5 and 30 nm can be obtained in this way. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of these materials for the storage and release of drugs in the brain. For that, we loaded valproic acid (VH) and sodic phenytoin (PH) molecules into an ordered mesoporous SiO2 by impregnation and characterized the drug impregnated SiO2 by standard physical and spectroscopic techniques to identify the parameters necessary to improve the capacity and quality of the reservoirs. Finally, a study of neurohistopathology of the effects of these reservoirs on brain tissue is presented. techniques to identify the parameters necessary to improve the capacity and quality of the reservoirs. Finally, a study of neurohistopathology of the effects of these reservoirs on brain tissue is presented. techniques to identify the parameters necessary to improve the capacity and quality of the reservoirs. Finally, a study of neurohistopathology of the effects of these reservoirs on brain tissue is presented. as drug reservoirs. The latter were prepared by the sol–gel process using tetraethyl orthosilicate TEOS as precursor to form the ‘‘sol’’ and P123 surfactant as the organic structure-directing agent. In addition to the nontoxic nature of amorphous silica, uniform and tunable pore sizes between 2.5 and 30 nm can be obtained in this way. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of these materials for the storage and release of drugs in the brain. For that, we loaded valproic acid (VH) and sodic phenytoin (PH) molecules into an ordered mesoporous SiO2 by impregnation and characterized the drug impregnated SiO2 by standard physical and spectroscopic techniques to identify the parameters necessary to improve the capacity and quality of the reservoirs. Finally, a study of neurohistopathology of the effects of these reservoirs on brain tissue is presented. techniques to identify the parameters necessary to improve the capacity and quality of the reservoirs. Finally, a study of neurohistopathology of the effects of these reservoirs on brain tissue is presented. techniques to identify the parameters necessary to improve the capacity and quality of the reservoirs. Finally, a study of neurohistopathology of the effects of these reservoirs on brain tissue is presented. 2 nanostructures were developed as drug reservoirs. The latter were prepared by the sol–gel process using tetraethyl orthosilicate TEOS as precursor to form the ‘‘sol’’ and P123 surfactant as the organic structure-directing agent. In addition to the nontoxic nature of amorphous silica, uniform and tunable pore sizes between 2.5 and 30 nm can be obtained in this way. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of these materials for the storage and release of drugs in the brain. For that, we loaded valproic acid (VH) and sodic phenytoin (PH) molecules into an ordered mesoporous SiO2 by impregnation and characterized the drug impregnated SiO2 by standard physical and spectroscopic techniques to identify the parameters necessary to improve the capacity and quality of the reservoirs. Finally, a study of neurohistopathology of the effects of these reservoirs on brain tissue is presented. techniques to identify the parameters necessary to improve the capacity and quality of the reservoirs. Finally, a study of neurohistopathology of the effects of these reservoirs on brain tissue is presented. techniques to identify the parameters necessary to improve the capacity and quality of the reservoirs. Finally, a study of neurohistopathology of the effects of these reservoirs on brain tissue is presented. 2 by impregnation and characterized the drug impregnated SiO2 by standard physical and spectroscopic techniques to identify the parameters necessary to improve the capacity and quality of the reservoirs. Finally, a study of neurohistopathology of the effects of these reservoirs on brain tissue is presented. 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Temporal lobe epilepsy; Drug delivery; Nanostructured reservoir; SBA-15; Sodic phenytoin; Valproic acidTemporal lobe epilepsy; Drug delivery; Nanostructured reservoir; SBA-15; Sodic phenytoin; Valproic acid
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