INVESTIGADORES
BUTELER micaela
artículos
Título:
Novel use of nanostructured alumina
Autor/es:
STADLER, T.; BUTELER, M.; D. K. WEAVER
Revista:
PEST MANAGEMENT SCIENCE
Editorial:
JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD
Referencias:
Año: 2010 vol. 66 p. 577 - 577
ISSN:
1526-498X
Resumen:
BACKGROUND: The worldwide need to produce an inexpensive and abundant food supply for a growing population is a great challenge that is further complicated by concerns about risks to environmental stability and human health triggered by the use of pesticides. The result is the ongoing development of alternative pest control strategies, and new, lower-risk insecticidal molecules. Among the recent technological advances in agricultural science, nanotechnology shows considerable promise, although its development for use in crop protection is in its initial stages. RESULTS: This study reports for the first time the insecticidal effect of nanostructured alumina. Two specieswere used asmodel organisms, Sitophilus oryzae L. and Rhyzopertha dominica (F.), which aremajor insect pests in stored food supplies throughout theworld. Both species experienced significantmortality after 3 days of continuous exposure to treated wheat. Nine days after treatment, the median lethal doses (LD50) observed ranged from 127 to 235 mg kg−1. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. theworld. Both species experienced significantmortality after 3 days of continuous exposure to treated wheat. Nine days after treatment, the median lethal doses (LD50) observed ranged from 127 to 235 mg kg−1. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. theworld. Both species experienced significantmortality after 3 days of continuous exposure to treated wheat. Nine days after treatment, the median lethal doses (LD50) observed ranged from 127 to 235 mg kg−1. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. theworld. Both species experienced significantmortality after 3 days of continuous exposure to treated wheat. Nine days after treatment, the median lethal doses (LD50) observed ranged from 127 to 235 mg kg−1. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. theworld. Both species experienced significantmortality after 3 days of continuous exposure to treated wheat. Nine days after treatment, the median lethal doses (LD50) observed ranged from 127 to 235 mg kg−1. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. theworld. Both species experienced significantmortality after 3 days of continuous exposure to treated wheat. Nine days after treatment, the median lethal doses (LD50) observed ranged from 127 to 235 mg kg−1. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. theworld. Both species experienced significantmortality after 3 days of continuous exposure to treated wheat. Nine days after treatment, the median lethal doses (LD50) observed ranged from 127 to 235 mg kg−1. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. Sitophilus oryzae L. and Rhyzopertha dominica (F.), which aremajor insect pests in stored food supplies throughout theworld. Both species experienced significantmortality after 3 days of continuous exposure to treated wheat. Nine days after treatment, the median lethal doses (LD50) observed ranged from 127 to 235 mg kg−1. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects. 50) observed ranged from 127 to 235 mg kg−1. CONCLUSION: Comparison of these results with recommended rates for commercial insecticidal dusts suggests that inorganic nanostructured aluminamay provide a cheap and reliable alternative for control of insect pests. This study expands the frontiers for nanoparticle-based technologies in pest management. Further research is needed to identify its mode of action and its non-target toxicity, and to determine the potential of other nanostructured materials as pest control options for insects.