INVESTIGADORES
KOCHEN Sara Silvia
artículos
Título:
Effect of Unilateral Low-Frequency Stimulation of Hippocampus on Rapid Kindling—Induced Seizure Development in Rats
Autor/es:
LUCAS TOIBARO, MAGDALENA PEREYRA, JULIETA PASTORINO, ARIELA SMIGLIANI, FLORENCIA OCARIZ, GERMÁN ORTMANN, MARÍA MILAGROS GALARDI, MARÍA BELÉN GORI, SILVIA KOCHEN
Revista:
Neuroscience & Medicine
Editorial:
Scientific Research
Referencias:
Año: 2012 vol. 3 p. 174 - 174
ISSN:
2158-2912
Resumen:
Since the last decade deep brain stimulation has been proposed as an alternative treatment for patients who do not become seizure-free with the current pharmacological treatments and cannot undergo resective surgical procedure. However, the optimal stimulation parameters remain undetermined and active research in humans and animals is necessary. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of unilateral Low Frequency Stimulation (LFS) of hippocampus on seizure development by using the hippocampal rapid kindling method (hRK) in rats. We used male Wistar rats implanted with electrodes in the ventral hippocampus. All rats underwent hRK (biphasic square wave pulses, 20 Hz for 10 seconds) during three consecutive days (twelve stimulations per day). The control group (hRK; n = 6) received only RK stimulus, while the treated group (LFS-hRK; n = 8) received also LFS (biphasic square wave pulses, 1 Hz for 30 seconds) immediately before the RK stimulus, during three consecutive days. At the end of behavioral testing on day 3, 62% (P < 0.05) of the animals receiving LFS treatment were still not fully kindled staying in stages 0-III (P < 0.01). The number of stimulations needed to achieve generalized seizures (stage IV-V of Racine scale) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the LFS group with respect to control group. No significant differences in the cumulative daily afterdischarge duration were observed between both groups. These findings suggest that preemptive LFS can significantly decrease the incidence of hippocampus-kindled seizures and delay the progression and secondary generalization of focal seizures.