INVESTIGADORES
MORALES Carolina Laura
artículos
Título:
Comparative nectar-foraging behaviors and efficiencies of an alien and a native bumble bee
Autor/es:
AIZEN MARCELO ADRIAN; LOZADA MARIANA; MORALES CAROLINA LAURA
Revista:
BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS
Editorial:
SPRINGER
Referencias:
Lugar: Berlin; Año: 2011 vol. 13 p. 2901 - 2901
ISSN:
1387-3547
Resumen:
Resource preemption by alien organisms can contribute to their invasion success and the demise of functionally equivalent native species, particularly when opportunistic foraging by aliens results in more efficient exploitation. In forests of NW Patagonia, the only native bumble bee and major pollinator, Bombus dahlbomii, declined almost to extinction as the alien B. ruderatus increased in abundance since its first appearance about 17 years ago. To explore whether resource competition might have driven this displacement we studied the behavior and foraging efficiency of both bumble bees while they harvested nectar from flowers of Alstroemeria aurea, the main summer food resource in the forests of NW Patagonia. We compared the nectar content of flowers that bees selected, recently visited, and rejected with that of randomly-chosen neighboring flowers and assessed differences in visitation rates. The native bumble bee selects flowers with abundant nectar and mostly exploits nectar-rich flower patches by rejecting a higher proportion of flowers with little or no nectar. On the other hand, the alien bumble bee discriminated less with respect to sugar content per visited flower, but visited more flowers per minute. Workers of the native bumble bee harvested ~70% more sugar per unit of time than those of the alien species in absolute terms, and a similar amount when sugar harvested was expressed as a percentage of body mass. In contrast to expectation, the opportunistic foraging of the alien bumblebee was not more efficient and therefore cannot explain the ecological extinction of the native species through exploitative competition. These findings suggest that the displacement of the native species by the alien may be driven by other factors, such as the associated introduction of novel diseases or parasites.
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