INVESTIGADORES
HONGN Fernando Daniel
capítulos de libros
Título:
Upper-crustal structure of the Central Andes inferred from dip curvature analysis of isostatic residual gravity.
Autor/es:
RILLER, U., GĂ–TZE, H.-J., SCHMIDT, S., TRUMBULL, R., HONGN, F. Y PETRINOVIC, I.,
Libro:
The Andes - Active Subduction Orogeny.
Editorial:
Springer
Referencias:
Lugar: Berlin; Año: 2006; p. 327 - 336
Resumen:
The relationship between Bouguer gravity, isostatic residual gravity and its dip curvature, first-order structural elements and distribution of Neogene volcanic rocks was examined in the southern Altiplano and Puna plateaux. In the southern Altiplano, strong positive Bouguer gravity corresponds to areas affected by late Cenozoic faulting and large-scale folding of the upper crust. Dip curvature analysis of isostatic residual gravity shows that elongate zones of maximum curvature correspond remarkably well with the structural grain defined by first-order folds and faults. Similarly, isostatic residual gravity in the Puna is largely controlled by prominent, upper-crustal structures but also by the distribution of Miocene and younger volcanic rocks. The Central Andean Gravity High, in particular, is confined by Neogene volcanic rocks and is mostly associated with areas of low topography, i.e., fault-bound, internally-drained basins. Dip curvature analysis of the isostatic residual gravity field shows that elongate zones of maximal curvature correlate with the strike of prominent Neogene faults. Our study suggests that such analysis constitutes an important tool for imaging upper-crustal structures, even those that are not readily apparent at surface. For example, upper-crustal faults in the Salar de Atacama area, the presence of which is suggested by the dip curvature of residual gravity, offers a plausible explanation for the pronounced angular departure of the volcanic belt from its overall meridional trend and its narrowing south of the salar. In contrast to previous interpretations, our study suggests that gravity anomalies of the central Andes have arisen chiefly from late Cenozoic volcanism and tectonism. Furthermore, dip curvature analyses of gravity fields bear great potential for elucidating first-order structural elements of deformed, upper-crustal terranes such as the modern Andes.
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