BECAS
GONZALEZ MORENO Candelaria
artículos
Título:
Bacterial communities from vagina of dairy healthy heifers and cows with impaired reproductive performance.
Autor/es:
GONZALEZ MORENO CANDELARIA; ANDREA TORRES LUQUE; KLIBS N. GALVÃO; MARÍA CLAUDIA OTERO
Revista:
RESEARCH IN VETERINARY SCIENCE
Editorial:
ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Referencias:
Lugar: Amsterdam; Año: 2021
ISSN:
0034-5288
Resumen:
The vaginal microenvironment plays a significant role in bovine fertility since its resident microorganisms interact with the host´s mucosa and constitutes the first barrier against ascending pathogens of the reproductive tract. In this study, the vaginal microbiome of healthy heifers (H) and cows with impaired reproductive performance, metritis/endometritis (MT) or repeat breeders (RB), was assessed using a 16S rRNA gene sequencing approach. Analysis revealed that even though a vaginal core microbiota (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Tenericutes, Fusobacteria and Actinobacteria) was shared among healthy heifers and cows with uterine disease; further analysis at genus level showed significant differences depending on the reproductive health status. The relative abundances of recognized uterine pathogens such us Bacteroidetes, Fusobacterium and Helcococcus were higher in MT when compared with H and RB; therefore, their presence in vagina can be consider as a risk factor for fertility failure. The present study describes for the first time, the composition of native bacterial communities in vagina of cows undergoing the Repeat Breeding Syndrome (RBS), and reports an association between this disease and the presence of Porphyromonas and with unassigned genera of the Pasteurellaceae family. In addition, this work highlights the bacteria associated with a healthy vagina: genera from the families Lachnospiraceae, Rikenellaceae and the genera Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Oscillospira, Ureaplasma, CF231 and 5-7NS. Results highlighted herein, signify the potential of the evaluation and control of the bovine vaginal microbiome to improve pregnancy rates however, further research is needed to elucidate the balance of bacterial species resulting in an optimal reproductive health.