INVESTIGADORES
DORADO Jimena
artículos
Título:
Evaluating sampling completeness in a desert plant-pollinator network
Autor/es:
CHACOFF, NATACHA P; DIEGO P. VÁZQUEZ; LOMÁSCOLO, SILVIA; ERICA L. STEVANI; DORADO JIMENA; BENIGNO PADRÓN MENDEZ
Revista:
JOURNAL OF ANIMAL ECOLOGY
Editorial:
WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC
Referencias:
Lugar: Londres; Año: 2012 p. 190 - 190
ISSN:
0021-8790
Resumen:
p { margin-bottom: 0.21cm; } 1- The sutdy of plant-pollinator interactions in a network context is receiving increasing attention. This approach has helped to identify several emerging network patterns such as nestedness and modularity. However, most studies are based only on qualitative information, and some ecosystems, such as deserts and tropical forests, are uderrrepresented in these datasets. 2- We present an exaustive analysis of the structure of a four-year plant-pollinator network from the Monte desert in Argentina using both qualitative and quantitative tools. We described the structure of this network and evaluate the completeness of our sampling using asymptotic species interactions and to estimate the minimun number of additional ampling required to detect 90% of the interactions. We evaluated completeness of detection of the community-wide pollinator fauna, of the pollinator fauna associated to each plant species and of the plant-pollinator interactions. We also evaluated whether sampling completeness was influenced by plant characteristics, such as flower abundance, flower phenological span, sampling effort, number of interspecific links (degree) and selectiness in the identity of flower visitors. 3- We found that this desert plant-pollinator network has a nested structure and that it exibits modulrity and high network-level generalization. 4- In spite of our high sampling effort, and although we sampled 80% of the pollinator fauna we recorded only 55% of the interactions. Thus, although a 0.64-fold increase in sampling effort would suffice to detect 90% of the pollinator species, 5-fold increase in sampling effort would be necessary to detect 90% of the interactions. 5- Detection of interactions was incomplete for most plant species, particularly those with a long flowering season, high flower abundance or a high level of specialization. Our results suggest that to minimize this incompleteness, sampling effort should be adjusted to length of the flowering season, flower abundance and plant specialization, with greater effort on specialized plants with a long flowering season and abundant flowers. 6- Sampling the diversity of interactions is labor intensive, and most plant-pollinator network published to date likely to be undersampled. Our analysis allowed estimating the completeness of our ampling, the additional effort needed to detect most interactions and the plant traits tat influence the detection of their interactions.
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