INVESTIGADORES
TORRECILLA Norma Mariana
artículos
Título:
Effects of sodium valproate and carbamazepine on food competition aggression in pigeons
Autor/es:
FACHINELLI, C.; AHUMADA, M.; FACHINELLI, J.M.; TORRECILLA, N.M.; RODRIGUEZ ECHAND√ćA, E.L.
Revista:
BRAZILIAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH
Editorial:
ASSOC BRAS DIVULG CIENTIFICA
Referencias:
Lugar: Brazil; Año: 2007 vol. 40 p. 849 - 849
ISSN:
0100-879X
Resumen:
Valproate and carbamazepine (CAR) have been proposed as adjunct alternatives for the control of aggression in psychiatric patients, although no definite conclusions have been reached. We examined the effects of these drugs on food competition offensive aggression and other behaviors in high- and low-aggression food-restricted pigeons. These were divided into pairs containing previously ranked high-aggression (N = 10 pairs) and low-aggression females (N = 10 pairs). In Experiment 1, a pigeon in each pair of high- and low-aggression subjects was treated daily with an oral dose of sodium valproate (50 mg kg-1 mL saline-1) for 15 days. The other animal received the vehicle. On days 1, 7, and 15, food competition trials (10 min) were performed 60 min after treatment. In Experiment 2, one pigeon in each pair was treated daily with an oral dose of CAR (20 mg kg-1 mL saline-1) for 15 days. Each pair was submitted to a food competition trial on days 1, 7, and 15 of treatment. Valproate (15 days of treatment) selectively decreased the time spent in offensive aggression (control: 102.7 +/- 9.3 vs valproate: 32.7 +/- 9.2 s; P < 0.001, ANOVA-2-TAU) of high-aggression pigeons. This was also the case for 7 and 15 days of CAR treatment (control: 131.5 +/- 8.9 vs CAR: 60.4 +/- 5.3, P < 0.01, and control: 122.7 +/- 7.1 vs CAR: 39.1 +/- 5.2; P < 0.001, ANOVA-2-TAU, respectively). Thus, the two anticonvulsive drugs have a similar effect on food competition aggression in pigeons.
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