PERSONAL DE APOYO
ADROVER Ezequiela
congresos y reuniones científicas
Título:
Prenatal stress effect on glutamatergic synthesis and uptake
Autor/es:
ADROVER E, KATUNAR M.R, PALLARES M.E, BAIER C.J, SCHOUSBOE A. Y ANTONELLI M.C
Reunión:
Congreso; • V Congreso de la Sociedad de Neurotoxicidad (NTS); 2011
Resumen:
PRENATAL STRESS EFFECT ON GLUTAMATERGIC SYNTHESIS AND UPTAKE. Adrover E.1, Katunar M.R.1, Pallares M.E.1, Baier C.J.1, Schousboe A.2 y Antonelli M.C.1 1IQUIFIB (UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica. UBA. Buenos Aires. Argentina. 2Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences University of Copenhagen. Copenhagen. Denmark.   Episodes of stress suffered by the mother during pregnancy generate changes in the fetal environment affecting central nervous system development of the offspring. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that adult offspring of stressed rats exhibited higher levels of glutamate receptors than control rats. These animals also show long-lasting astroglial reaction and a reduced dendritic arborization with synaptic loss. Since metabolism of glutamate is linked to a cycle between neurons and sorrounding astroglia, our results suggest that glutamate neurotransmitter pathways might be impaired in the brain of a prenatally stressed rats. To study the effect of prenatal stress (PS) on the metabolism of glutamate, pregnant rats were subjected to restrain stress during the last week of gestation. Brain extracts of PS rats were evaluated by mass spectroscopy to measure the content of glutamate and other metabolites. The results show no differences between control and PS animals in the glutamate metabolism. We also evaluated glutamate uptake and the protein level of glutamate transporters. Our results show that glutamate uptake of adult (PND 60) PS rats is significantly higher than in control rats. This would indicate that prenatal stress produces long-term changes in the glutamatergic system modulating the expression of glutamate receptors and altering the normal synaptic transmission of the adult brain.
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