INVESTIGADORES
KOWALEWSKI Miguel Martin
capítulos de libros
Título:
Bertiella sp. Infection patterns in black and gold howler monkeys across their distribution.
Autor/es:
KOWALEWSKI, M MARTIN; TORRES, JULIO; MILOZZI, CAROLA; GILLESPIE, THOMAS R
Libro:
Primatology in Argentina.
Editorial:
Sociedad Argentina para el Estudio de Mamiferos
Referencias:
Lugar: Ciudad A de Buenos Aires; Año: 2016;
Resumen:
The response to parasitism and pathogen infection is expected to vary among primate species according to differences in ecology, behavior, and life history. Bertielliasis is a zoonosis produced by the parasite Bertiella mucronata in South America. We explored the relationship between black and gold howlers (Alouatta caraya) and B. mucronata as a proxy for individual health. We present 12 months of results from a long-term study site that included 3 howler monkey populations that differ in their degree of contact with human populations and from the literature. At long-term sites, we found a lower likelihood of infection in rural sites vs. remote sites and during summer vs. fall and spring. All sites had a high prevalence of B. mucronata (up to 95%) suggesting that howler monkeys may serve as viable reservoirs of this tapeworm. We found higher prevalence in interface populations (wildlife/livestock/humans) compared to other sites. Our results suggest a long period of coexistence, potentially associated with resistance to the parasite due to its low pathogenicity. These parasites may benefit howlers by 1) occupying a niche that stops other parasites from colonizing and 2) stimulating immunity toward similar parasites.
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