CIFICEN   24414
CENTRO DE INVESTIGACIONES EN FISICA E INGENIERIA DEL CENTRO DE LA PROVINCIA DE BUENOS AIRES
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
artículos
Título:
Magnetic evaluation of TSP-filters for air quality monitoring
Autor/es:
ANA G. CASTAÑEDA-MIRANDA; HARALD N. BÖHNEL; ROBERTO S. MOLINA-GARZA; MARCOS A.E. CHAPARRO
Revista:
ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT
Editorial:
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Referencias:
Lugar: Amsterdam; Año: 2014 vol. 96 p. 163 - 163
ISSN:
1352-2310
Resumen:
We present the magnetic properties of the powders collected by high volume total suspended particle air samplers used to monitor atmospheric pollution in Santiago de Querétaro, a city of one million people in central Mexico. The magnetic measurements have been combined with scanning electron microscopy observations and analysis, in order to characterize the particles captured in the filters as natural and anthropogenic. The main goal of the study is to test if magnetic measurements on the sampled atmospheric dust can be effective, low-cost, proxy to qualitatively estimate the air quality, complementing the traditional analytical methods. The magnetic properties of the powder collected in the filters have been investigated measuring the low field magnetic susceptibility, hysteresis loops, thermomagnetic curves, and isothermal remanent magnetization. The rock magnetism data have been supplemented by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that the main magnetic carrier is low Ti magnetite in the PSD range with a contribution from SP particles, and small but significant contributions from hematite, maghemite and goethite particles. Total suspended particles in the atmosphere during the monitored days ranged between about 30 and 280 µg/m³. Magnetic susceptibility values are well correlated with the independently determined total suspended particles concentration (R=0.93), but particle concentration does not correlate as well with IRM1T. This may be attributed to contributions from SP and paramagnetic particles to the susceptibility signal, but not to the remanence. The effects of climate in particle size, composition and concentration were considered in terms of precipitation and wind intensity, but they are actually minor. The main effect of climate appears to be the removal of SP particles during rainy days. There is a contribution to air pollution from natural mineral sources, which we attribute to low vegetation cover in the region´s arid climate. The concentration of the magnetic particles and their grain-size vary according to the location of the monitoring station, with higher contributions to anthropogenic Fe-rich particles from vehicle emissions in the city center and other metals in the industrial parks. Metals of interest, usually diagnostic of atmospheric pollution (Fe, As, Sb, Cr, Mo, V, Zn, Ba, Pb, and Cu) were identified by means of electron microscopy.
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