INVESTIGADORES
SCHLEICH Cristian Eric
artículos
Título:
Sound transmission and burrow characteristics of the subterranean rodent Ctenomys talarum
Autor/es:
SCHLEICH, C.E.; ANTENUCCI, C.D.
Revista:
ACTA THERIOLOGICA
Editorial:
POLISH ACAD SCIENCES
Referencias:
Año: 2009 vol. 54 p. 165 - 165
ISSN:
0001-7051
Resumen:
Males of tuco-tuco Ctenomys talarum Thomas, 1898 use particular burrow’sentrances to emit their territorial vocalization. Therefore we studied theinternal structure of these entrances and the possible effect on the emissionand propagation of airborne sounds. Externally, the burrow entrances used bytuco-tucos males to vocalize were characterized by the absence of sandmounds around their openings. Internally, most of the burrow’s entrancesconsisted of a main, relatively straight, tunnel of 30–40 cm length, with adiameter of 5.7–6.4 cm. After passing through the burrow’s entrance, thelow-frequency components of an artificial signal played back inside the tunnelwere not only less attenuated but also amplified (measured at 10–30 cm fromthe burrow opening). Therefore, the emission of territorial vocalizations insidethe particular burrow’s entrances may be considered as a complex adaptativebehavior, in which burrow structure improves the signal emission andpropagation. Moreover, this work also showed that C. talarum’s territorialvocalization seems to be adequate for long, inter-burrow communication, sinceits physical characteristics (high amplitude and low main frequency) areconcomitant with the frequencies that are better transmitted in the naturalhabitat of this species of subterranean rodent.Ctenomys talarum Thomas, 1898 use particular burrow’sentrances to emit their territorial vocalization. Therefore we studied theinternal structure of these entrances and the possible effect on the emissionand propagation of airborne sounds. Externally, the burrow entrances used bytuco-tucos males to vocalize were characterized by the absence of sandmounds around their openings. Internally, most of the burrow’s entrancesconsisted of a main, relatively straight, tunnel of 30–40 cm length, with adiameter of 5.7–6.4 cm. After passing through the burrow’s entrance, thelow-frequency components of an artificial signal played back inside the tunnelwere not only less attenuated but also amplified (measured at 10–30 cm fromthe burrow opening). Therefore, the emission of territorial vocalizations insidethe particular burrow’s entrances may be considered as a complex adaptativebehavior, in which burrow structure improves the signal emission andpropagation. Moreover, this work also showed that C. talarum’s territorialvocalization seems to be adequate for long, inter-burrow communication, sinceits physical characteristics (high amplitude and low main frequency) areconcomitant with the frequencies that are better transmitted in the naturalhabitat of this species of subterranean rodent.