IDEA   23902
INSTITUTO DE DIVERSIDAD Y ECOLOGIA ANIMAL
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
artículos
Título:
Differential Regulation of Arylalkylamine N-Acetyltransferase Activity in Chicken Retinal Ganglion Cells by Light and the Circadian Clock
Autor/es:
DIEGO J. VALDEZ; EDUARDO GARBARINO-PICO; NICOLAS M. DIAZ; MARIO E. GUIDO
Revista:
CHRONOBIOLOGY INTERNATIONAL
Editorial:
TAYLOR & FRANCIS INC
Referencias:
Lugar: Londres; Año: 2012 vol. 29 p. 1011 - 1011
ISSN:
0742-0528
Resumen:
Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) contain circadian clocks driving melatonin synthesis during the day, a subset of these cells acting as nonvisual photoreceptors sending photic information to the brain. In this work, the authors investigated the temporal and light regulation of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) activity, a key enzyme in melatonin synthesis. The authors first examined this activity in RGCs of wild-type chickens and compared it to that in photoreceptor cells (PRs) from animals maintained for 48 h in constant dark (DD), light (LL), or regular 12-h:12-h light-dark (LD) cycle. AA-NAT activity in RGCs displayed circadian rhythmicity, with highest levels during the subjective day in both DD and LL as well as in the light phase of the LD cycle. In contrast, AA-NAT activity in PRs exhibited the typical nocturnal peak in DD and LD, but no detectable oscillation was observed under LL, under which conditions the levels were basal at all times examined. A light pulse of 30–60 min significantly decreased AANAT activity in PRs during the subjective night, but had no effect on RGCs during the day or night. Intraocular injection of dopamine (50 nmol/eye) during the night to mimic the effect of light presented significant inhibition of AA-NAT activity in PRs compared to controls but had no effect on RGCs. The results clearly demonstrate that the regulation of the diurnal increase in AA-NAT activity in RGCs of chickens undergoes a different control mechanism from that observed in PRs, in which the endogenous clock, light, and dopamine exhibited differential effects.