IBBM   21076
INSTITUTO DE BIOTECNOLOGIA Y BIOLOGIA MOLECULAR
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
congresos y reuniones científicas
Título:
Unrevealing the translational reprogramming of root cells during nitrogen fixing symbiosis
Autor/es:
KAREN HOBECKER; JULIA BAILEY-SERRES (UNIVERSIDAD DE CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE); MAURICIO ALBERTO REYNOSO; MAUREEN HUMMEL (UNIVERSIDAD DE CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE); MAR√ćA EUGENIA ZANETTI; SOLEDAD TRAUBENIK; MILAGROS FERRARI; FLAVIO ANTONIO BLANCO
Lugar:
Glasgow
Reunión:
Congreso; Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions (MPMI) Congress; 2019
Institución organizadora:
IS-MPMI
Resumen:
Legume plants have acquired the ability to establish a nitrogen fixing symbiosis with rhizobial bacteria. The establishment of this symbiotic interaction requires the formation of a new lateral root organ, the nodule, and the suppression of the immune response that will allow rhizobia to infect the root tissue. The activation and coordination of these two processes require the reprogramming of root cells for symbiosis, which is accompanied by dramatic alterations in gene expression. Regulation of gene expression occurs at different tiers, including transcriptional, co-transcriptional and post-transcriptional events. Our studies have been focused on the co- and post- transcriptional events, including alternative splicing, translation and non-coding RNA-mediated repression. By combining TRAP (Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification) with Ribosome footprinting, we have profiled the root translatome at early stages of the legume-rhizobia symbiosis. Our results reveal that translation of hundreds of transcripts is finely regulated by rhizobia and that translational alterations are not necessarily correlated with changes in transcript abundance. Transcripts with altered translational status include protein-coding and non-coding RNAs, some of which exhibited cell-specific regulation. Transcript variants produced by either alternative splicing or alternative cleavage and polyadenylation are also tightly regulated at translational level. Using molecular and genetic approaches we have revealed that these translationally regulated transcripts play crucial roles in the establishment of a successful nitrogen fixing symbiosis.