IANIGLA   20881
INSTITUTO ARGENTINO DE NIVOLOGIA, GLACIOLOGIA Y CIENCIAS AMBIENTALES
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
artículos
Título:
Climatology of Winter Orographic Precipitation over the Subtropical Central Andes and associated Synoptic and Regional Characteristics
Autor/es:
MAXIMILIANO VIALE; MARIO N. NUÑEZ
Revista:
JOURNAL OF HYDROMETEOROLOGY
Editorial:
AMER METEOROLOGICAL SOC
Referencias:
Lugar: Boston; Año: 2010
ISSN:
1525-755X
Resumen:
Winter orographic precipitation over the Andes between 308 and 378S is examined using precipitation gauges in the mountains and adjacent lowlands. Because of the limited number of precipitation gauges, this paper focuses on the large-scale variation in cross-barrier precipitation and does not take into account the fine ridge–valley scale. The maximum amount of precipitation was observed on the windward slope of the mountain range below the crest, which was twice that observed on the low-windward side between 32.58–348S. Toward the east of the crest, precipitation amounts drop sharply, generating a strong cross-barrier gradient. The rain shadow effect is greater in the north (328–34.58S) than in the south (358–36.58S) of the low-lee side, which is probably due to more baroclinic activity in southernmost latitudes and a southward decrease in the height of the Andes enabling more spillover precipitation. The effect of the Andes on winter precipitation is so marked that it modifies the precipitation regimes in the adjacent windward and leeward lowlands north of 358S. Based on the fact that ;75% of the wintertime precipitation accumulated in the fourth quartile, through four or five heavy events in average, the synoptic-scale patterns of the heavy (into fourth quartile) orographic precipitation events were identified. Heavy events are strongly related to strong water vapor transport from the Pacific Ocean in the pre-cold-front environment of extratropical cyclones, which would have the form of atmospheric rivers as depicted in the reanalysis and rawinsonde data. The composite fields revealed a marked difference between two subgroups of heavy precipitation events. The extreme (100–95th percentiles) events are associated with deeper cyclones than that for intense (95–75th percentiles) events. These deeper cyclones lead to much stronger plumes of water vapor content and cross-barrier moisture flux against the high Andes, resulting in heavier orographic precipitation for extreme events. In addition, regional airflow characteristics suggest that the low-level flowis typically blocked and diverted poleward in the formof an along-barrier jet.On the lee side, downslope flow dominates during heavy events, producing prominent rain shadow effects as denoted by the domain of downslope winds extending to low-leeward side (i.e., Zonda wind).
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