INVESTIGADORES
LUNA Facundo
artículos
Título:
Understanding evolutionary variation in basalmetabolic rate: An analysis in subterranean rodents
Autor/es:
LUNA F; NAYA H; NAYA DE
Revista:
COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY A-MOLECULAR AND INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY
Editorial:
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC
Referencias:
Lugar: Amsterdam; Año: 2017 vol. 206 p. 87 - 87
ISSN:
1095-6433
Resumen:
Understanding howevolutionary variation in energetic metabolismarises is central to several theories in animal biology. Basalmetabolic rate (BMR) ?i.e., the minimumrate of energy necessary tomaintain thermal homeostasis in endotherms? is a highly informative measure to increase our understanding, because it is determined under highly standardized  conditions. In this study we evaluate the relationship between taxa- and mass-independent(residual) BMR and ten environmental factors for 34 subterranean rodent species. Both conventional and phylogenetically informed analyses indicate that ambient temperature is the major determinant of residual BMR,with both variables inversely correlated. By contrast, other environmental factors that have been shown to affect residual BMR in endotherms, such as habitat productivity and rainfall, were not significant predictors of residual BMR in this group of species. Then, the results for subterranean rodents appear to support a central prediction of the obligatory heat model (OHM), which is a mechanistic model aimed to explain the evolution of residual BMR. Specifically, OHM proposes that during the colonization of colder environments, individuals with greater masses of metabolically expensive tissues (and thus with greater BMR) are favored by natural selection due to the link between greatermasses ofmetabolically expensive tissues and physiological capacities. Thisway, natural selection should establishes a negative correlation between ambient temperature and both internal organ size and residual BMR.