IFLP   13074
INSTITUTO DE FISICA LA PLATA
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
congresos y reuniones científicas
Título:
The students´ interpretation of quantum mechanics concepts from the Feynman´s Sum of All Paths applied  to light 
Autor/es:
OTERO MARIA RITA; ELGUE MARIANA; FANARO MARIA DE LOS ANGELES; ARLEGO MARCELO
Lugar:
San Pablo
Reunión:
Congreso; 2nd World Conference on Physics Education (2nd WCPE); 2016
Institución organizadora:
GIREP-IUPAP
Resumen:
In this work we analyze part of the implementation of a didactic sequence to teach different aspects of light in a unified non traditional framework. The goal was to propose the quantum theory of light as a universal framework to describe different phenomena observed. The sequence was carried outin four courses of two secondary  schools,  with  N=83  students  aged  15‐16,  during  23  school  hours  approximately.  The  syllabus corresponding to this age group (second to last) in high school advocates the teaching of light phenomena. The Feynman approach was used in undergraduate courses for non‐specialists, in teacher training. Furthermore, in the Advancing Physics project of an A‐level physics course for the British high school system the quantum physics chapter istreated using the sum over paths approach. However, there are still no results about the viability of  introducing this alternative way of quantum mechanics teaching in high school. The data analysis, using a qualitative methology, was based on all the students? productions. An answer categorization was formulated, considering among other aspects the one of the quantum reformulation of experiences shown herein. This analysis seeks tounderstand the student´s conceptualization process about quantum interpretation. In this way it is possible to know how viable the sequence would be and which changes could be necessaryfor future implementations. The didactic sequence started from the students prediction of the results of the experiences of reflection, refraction and the double slit experiment (DSE). Then  these experiences  were carried out  in  the  classroom, using a  laser  light source. Later the results of the DSE showing individual detections were presented through a sequence of real images of the DSE with very low intensity light. This enabled to show the individual detection events on the screen, which evolved into a definite pattern of alternated fringes on the screen. The laws of quantum mechanics for light using the Feynman´s ?Sum of all Paths? approach (SAP), adapted to the mathematical level of the students was proposed as a model to explain the experiences. Graphic representations and basic operations with vectors capturing the essential aspects of  the theory, were used. Simulations made with the software GeoGebra(R) were  created  to  help  students  visualize  the  SAP  technique  results  to  the  simple  case  of  light  emission  and detection, and light reflection and refraction. Then the SPA was applied to the DSE to describe those results obtained in the situation relative to the localized detection and the alternated fringes pattern. Here we present the  results  regarding  the  way  that  the  students  applied  the  SAP  technique  and  interpreted  the  previous experiences using the quantum framework. Regarding the reformulation of refraction and reflection  laws  in quantum terms, more than half of the students (n=67) could interpret the experiences using the concepts of SAP technique (e.g. light minimum time trip). However only n=16 students remained in a classical context, or they used the SPA technique inappropriately; they confused the vector angle with the light path angle shown in  the  Geogebra(R)  simulation.  Considering  the  DSE,  n=38  students  interpreted  the  results  of  the  DSE  as individual detection events in terms of probability, then they could also interpret the graph of P(x) and finally they  linked  the  graph  with  the  results  obtained  in  the  DSE  realized  in  the  classroom.  Additionally,  they recognized the discrete aspect of light. Besides a good number of students (n=36) conceptualized adequately the quantum concepts presented, they could explain the fringes of light and darkness regarding the graph of the function P(x) previously obtained in the classroom. The graphic representations created by these students during  their  explanations  were  notable.  Only  n=9  students  had  difficulties  interpreting  the  DSE  from  SAP technique,  making  poor  resolutions  of  the  situations.  We  conclude  that  is  possible  to  teach basic  quantum concepts  from  Feynman?s  approach  to  the  secondary  school  students.  However,  minor  changes  in  the sequence would be necessary  to prevent some obstacles  identified  in  the conceptualization process. These changes mainly aim at reformulating the situations to attain a better qualitative understanding and improve the  students´  visualizations  of  the  model. 
rds']