INQUIMAE   12526
INSTITUTO DE QUIMICA, FISICA DE LOS MATERIALES, MEDIOAMBIENTE Y ENERGIA
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
congresos y reuniones científicas
Título:
Effect of Processing Conditions and Composition on Sodium Caseinate Emulsions Stability
Autor/es:
C. HUCK IRIART; R. J. CANDAL; M.L. HERRERA
Lugar:
Atenas
Reunión:
Congreso; 11th International Congress on Engineering and Food; 2011
Institución organizadora:
School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens
Resumen:
Many food products such as ice cream, yoghurt, and mayonnaise are some examples of emulsion-based food. The physicochemical properties of emulsions play an important role in food systems as they directly contribute to texture, sensory and nutritional properties of food. One of the main properties is stability which refers to the ability of an emulsion to resist physical changes over time. The aim of the present work was to analyze the effect of processing conditions and composition on sodium caseinate (NaCas) emulsions stability. The main destabilization mechanisms were identified and quantified. The relationship between them and the factors that influence them were also investigated. Emulsions stabilized with NaCas were prepared using an ultrasound liquid processor or a high pressure homogenizer. Stability of emulsions was followed by a Turbiscan (TMA 2000) which allows the optical characterization of any type of dispersion. The physicalevolution of this process is followed without disturbing the original system and with good accuracy and reproducibility. To further describe systems, droplet size distribution was analyzed with light scattering equipment. The main mechanism of destabilization in a given formulation depended on different factors such as NaCas concentration, droplet size or processing conditions. The rate of destabilization was markedly lower with addition of sugar or a hydrocolloid to the aqueous phase. Xanthan (XG) and locust bean (LBG) gums produced an increase in viscosity of the continuous phase and structural changes in emulsions such as gelation. Sugars interacted with the protein decreasing particle size and increasing emulsion stability. The stability of caseinate emulsions was strongly affected not only by the oil-to-protein ratio but also by processing conditions and composition of aqueous phase. The structure of the protein and the interactions protein?sugar or the presence of a hydrocolloid played a key role in creaming and flocculation processes of these emulsions.
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