CINDECA   05422
CENTRO DE INVESTIGACION Y DESARROLLO EN CIENCIAS APLICADAS "DR. JORGE J. RONCO"
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
congresos y reuniones científicas
Título:
Kinetic Adsorption of pharmaceutical compounds related to epilepsy treatment on titania and silica based materials,
Autor/es:
T. LÓPEZ; E. ORTIZ ISLAS; D. MEZA; E.I. BASALDELLA; R.D. GONZÁLEZ
Lugar:
México
Reunión:
Congreso; III Sol-gel Science and Application Congress; 2006
Resumen:
Among the drug delivery systems, inorganic porous materials are emerging as new category of host systems. Due to some interesting features such as their biological stability and their drug releasing properties, there is a significant and increasing interest in these potential carriers. Several nanostructured porous materials have been used such as TiO2 and SiO2, these materials present nanonized pores that permit the inclusion of drugs into the pore. This insertion is associated with adsorption and desorption processes that establish a dynamic equilibrium in the system. At a given pharmaceutical compound concentration, some portion of the drug is moving out of the solution on the porous material, and some portion is desorbing, moving towards the solution. The relevance of these processes remains on the information that can be provided in order to be applied in biological systems.             In this work sodic phenytoin was hosted in titania nanotubes and ordered mesoporous silica. The aim of this study was to determine the loading capacity of the antiepileptic drug on well ordered materials. The kinetic adsorption of sodic phenytoin in titania nanotubes and ordered silica based materials was investigated using UV-VIS spectroscopy. The results of this study showed that the maximum adsorption peak of phenytoin on the porous material occurred on the fourteen day after beginning the experiment. After this time, a dynamic behavior of adsorption-desorption was established until that phenytoin concentration reached a minimum. The Phenytoin-Titania and Phenytoin-SBA materials obtained represent a new alternative of drug delivery systems to treat the epilepsy disease.
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