INFIVE   05416
INSTITUTO DE FISIOLOGIA VEGETAL
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
artículos
Título:
Effect of radiation intensity on the outcome of postharvest UV-C treatments
Autor/es:
COTE, S; RODONI, L; CONCELLÓN, A; CIVELLO, PM; VICENTE AR
Revista:
POSTHARVEST BIOLOGY AND TECHNOLOGY
Editorial:
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Referencias:
Lugar: Amsterdam; Año: 2013 vol. 83 p. 83 - 83
ISSN:
0925-5214
Resumen:
Studies  on  the  use  of  UV-C  radiation  of  fresh  produce  have  focused  on  the  selection  of  appropriate  doses (energy  per  unit  area)  for  different  commodities,  but  little  attention  has  been  placed  on  the  effect  of radiation  intensity  (dose  per  unit  time).  In  this  study,  tomatoes  (Solanum  lycopersicum  cv.  Elpida)  and strawberries  (Fragaria  ×  ananassa  cv.  Camarosa),  were  harvested  (breaker  and  100%  of  surface  red  color respectively)  and  treated  with  4  kJ  m−2 of  UV-C,  at  low  (3  W  m−2)  or  high  (33  W  m−2)  radiation  intensities. Untreated  fruits  were  used  as  controls.  After  the  treatments  and  at  different  storage  times  the  incidence  of postharvest  rots  and  the  changes  in  fruit  physical  and  chemical  properties  were  determined.  UV-C  treatments  reduced  decay,  with  the  effects  being  were  more  marked  in  fruit  exposed  to  high  intensities.  Mold counts  were  unaffected  by  the  treatments,  suggesting  that  improved  disease  control  did  not  result  from greater  germicide  effect.  In  both  fruit  species  exposure  to  UV-C  radiation  delayed  ripening,  evidenced as  lower  color  development,  pigment  accumulation  and  softening.  UV-C-treated  fruit  maintained  better quality  than  the  control.  In  strawberry,  high  intensity  treatments  were  more  effective  to  prevent  deterioration  than  in  tomato  where  the  differences  between  UV-C  treatments  were  subtler.  Soluble  solids, titratable  acidity  and  ethanol  soluble  antioxidants  were  not  affected  regardless  of  the  UV-C  intensity.Consumer  tests  showed  higher  preference  of  fruit  treated  at  high  UV-C  intensity.  Results  show  that  in addition  to  the  applied  dose,  radiation  intensity  is  a  main  factor  determining  the  effectiveness  of  UV-C treatments  and  should  not  be  over-sighted.  For  a  given  dose,  increasing  radiation  intensity  may  in  some cases  maximize  the  benefits  of  UV-C  on  fruit  quality,  while  significantly  reducing  the  treatments  time.
rds']