MACNBR   00242
MUSEO ARGENTINO DE CIENCIAS NATURALES "BERNARDINO RIVADAVIA"
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
artículos
Título:
Causes of mortality in a Geoffroy’s cat population—a long-term survey using diverse recording methods
Autor/es:
JAVIER PEREIRA; NATALIA FRACASSI; VIRGINIA RAGO; HEBE DEL VALLE FERREYRA; CAROLINA MARULL; DENISE MCALOOSE; MARCELA UHART
Revista:
EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF WILDLIFE RESEARCH
Editorial:
SPRINGER
Referencias:
Año: 2010 vol. 56 p. 939 - 939
ISSN:
1612-4642
Resumen:
We present quantitative data on the impact of different causes of mortality in a Geoffroy’s cat (Leopardus geoffroyi) population inhabiting a protected area and adjacent cattle ranches in central Argentina. Between December 2000 and January 2009, we used three methods to collect data on causes of mortality in both the park and the ranches: (1) information obtained from 35 radiocollared Geoffroy’s cats monitored from 1 to 19 months; (2) a systematic survey of the areas to find non-collared dead animals; and (3) interviews of qualified informants. Deaths of radio-collared individuals in the park were due to predation by puma (Puma concolor) or starvation, whereas deaths in the ranches were attributed to starvation and predation by domestic dogs. The death of eight emigrant cats was attributed mainly to poaching. Cause of death of 39 non-collared Geoffroy’s cats was determined; deaths in the ranches were mainly due to predation by domestic dogs and poaching, whereas deaths in the park were attributed to predation by puma, poaching, and vehicle collision. Grouping all sources of information, human-related mortality accounted for most (62%) of Geoffroy’s cat deaths recorded during this study, with poaching and predation by dogs being the main causes of mortality. This study in Geoffroy’s cats is the first long-term survey of causes of mortality for a population of a small felid species in South America.’s cat (Leopardus geoffroyi) population inhabiting a protected area and adjacent cattle ranches in central Argentina. Between December 2000 and January 2009, we used three methods to collect data on causes of mortality in both the park and the ranches: (1) information obtained from 35 radiocollared Geoffroy’s cats monitored from 1 to 19 months; (2) a systematic survey of the areas to find non-collared dead animals; and (3) interviews of qualified informants. Deaths of radio-collared individuals in the park were due to predation by puma (Puma concolor) or starvation, whereas deaths in the ranches were attributed to starvation and predation by domestic dogs. The death of eight emigrant cats was attributed mainly to poaching. Cause of death of 39 non-collared Geoffroy’s cats was determined; deaths in the ranches were mainly due to predation by domestic dogs and poaching, whereas deaths in the park were attributed to predation by puma, poaching, and vehicle collision. Grouping all sources of information, human-related mortality accounted for most (62%) of Geoffroy’s cat deaths recorded during this study, with poaching and predation by dogs being the main causes of mortality. This study in Geoffroy’s cats is the first long-term survey of causes of mortality for a population of a small felid species in South America.