MACNBR   00242
MUSEO ARGENTINO DE CIENCIAS NATURALES "BERNARDINO RIVADAVIA"
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
artículos
Título:
Hunting the wolf: A molecular phylogeny of the wolf spiders (Araneae, Lycosidae)
Autor/es:
PIACENTINI, LUIS N.; RAMÍREZ, MARTÍN J.
Revista:
MOLECULAR PHYLOGENETICS AND EVOLUTION
Editorial:
ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE
Referencias:
Año: 2019 vol. 136 p. 227 - 227
ISSN:
1055-7903
Resumen:
Lycosids are a diverse family of spiders distributed worldwide. Previous studies recovered some of the deeper splits of the family, but with little support. We present a broad phylogenetic analysis of the Lycosidae including a wide geographic sampling of representatives and all the subfamilies described to date. Additionally, we extend the amount of molecular data used in previous studies (28S, 12S and NADH) through the inclusion of two additional markers, the nuclear H3 and the mitochondrial COI. We estimated the divergence times through the inclusion of fossils as calibration points and used the phylogenetic hypothesis obtained to explore the evolution of particular traits associated with dispersal capabilities. We recovered most of the currently recognized subfamilies with high nodal support. Based on these results, we synonymize Piratinae and Wadicosinae with Zoicinae and Pardosinae, respectively, and revalidate the subfamily Hippasinae. We corroborated that lycosids are a family with a relatively young origin that diversified with the reduction of tropical forests and the advance of open habitats. We show that a gradual accumulation of behavioral traits associated with ambulatory dispersal made Lycosidae the most vagrant subfamily of spiders, with an impressive ability to disperse long distances which helps to explain the worldwide distribution of some very young clades, such as the members of the subfamily Lycosinae.