MACNBR   00242
MUSEO ARGENTINO DE CIENCIAS NATURALES "BERNARDINO RIVADAVIA"
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
artículos
Título:
Variation in density, size, and morphology of the pulmonate limpet Siphonaria lessonii along the Southwestern Atlantic
Autor/es:
F. SCARABINO; TESO V.; M. G. PALOMO; GUTIERREZ, J,L.; L. P. ARRIBAS; SABRINA SORIA
Revista:
JOURNAL OF SEA RESEARCH
Editorial:
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Referencias:
Lugar: Amsterdam; Año: 2017 vol. 129 p. 29 - 29
ISSN:
1385-1101
Resumen:
The density, size, and morphology of coastal invertebrate species often predictably vary with latitude. In thisstudy we evaluate whether the density, size, and morphology of the pulmonate limpet, Siphonaria lessonii, in theSouthwestern Atlantic varies in agreement to the predictions of the abundance-centre hypothesis (i.e., higherdensities by the center of the species range), Bergmann´s rule (i.e., increasing body size with latitude), and Allen´srule (i.e., decreasing body surface to volume ratio with latitude). Our results indicate that the upper densitybounds of S. lessonii decrease with latitude across our study range, which may either contradict expectations ofthe abundant-centre model (i.e, if assuming a Temperate Southwestern Atlantic/Magellanic distribution; 27°S inthe Atlantic to 42°S in the Pacific) or represent a partial trend within a broader scale, abundant-centre pattern(i.e., when considering a panmictic distribution from the Temperate Southwestern Atlantic to the TemperateSoutheastern Pacific; 27°S in the Atlantic to 5°S in the Pacific). Limpet shell length (i.e., a surrogate of body size)was not significantly related to latitude (cf. Bergmann´s rule). The two principal components of morphologicalvariation in limpet shells ? which increased with decreasing shell surface to volume ratio ? showed positive andnegative relationships with latitude (i.e., contradictory support to Allen´s rule). From these analyses, we conclude(a) that the size and morphology of S. lessonii are primarily controlled by local conditions rather thanbroad-scale climatic or environmental gradients and, (b) that geographic marginality does not means reducedperformance in this species at least as it concerns to abundance and maximum size.