MACNBR   00242
MUSEO ARGENTINO DE CIENCIAS NATURALES "BERNARDINO RIVADAVIA"
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
artículos
Título:
Evolutionary History of South American Artiodactyla
Autor/es:
CASSINI, GUILLERMO HERNÁN; MERINO, MARIANO LISANDRO; MUÑOZ, NAHUEL ANTÚ
Revista:
Contribuciones del MACN
Editorial:
Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia"
Referencias:
Lugar: Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires; Año: 2016 p. 311 - 311
ISSN:
1666-5503
Resumen:
South American artiodactyls have a Holartic origin and reached the continent during the Great American Biotic Interchange. Among the 10 extant artiodactyl families, three, Tayassuidae, Camelidae and Cervidae arrived and survived to the present. They participate in the megahervibore climax of spectacularity during the Quaternary, but did not occupy or compete in the megaherbivore niche. They reached their maximum diversity during Lujanian Age, particularly the camelid and cervid families. In the late Quaternary, many of the larger tayassuids, camelids, and cervids (especially those with big antlers) went extinct. In recent times the cervids are the most diverse of South American artiodactyl families, while in Africa bovids are the most diverse. In certain cases there is a remarkable parallelism in ecological niche space and morphology between the continents, for example between African duikers and South American brocket deer. The shared ecomorphological traits seem to be very successful in forested habitats in warm climates.