MACNBR   00242
MUSEO ARGENTINO DE CIENCIAS NATURALES "BERNARDINO RIVADAVIA"
Unidad Ejecutora - UE
artículos
Título:
Echinoderms diversity in the Southwestern Atlantic
Autor/es:
MARTINEZ, M. I.; ARRIBAS L. P.; BERECOECHEA J.J; BROGGER, M. I.; P.E. PENCHASZADEH
Revista:
REVISTA DE BIOLOGíA TROPICAL
Editorial:
REVISTA DE BIOLOGIA TROPICAL
Referencias:
Lugar: Turrialba; Año: 2015 vol. 63 p. 115 - 115
ISSN:
0034-7744
Resumen:
Since 2009 the B/O Puerto Deseado has been performing benthic exploration cruises along the Argentine Sea and adjacent waters including Antarctica. The aim of this work was to enhance the knowledge on the diversity of echinoderms based on samples taken on three expeditions along the Argentinean coast (35º-55ºS) and near the Antarctic Peninsula. The first campaign, Mejillón II (M-II; 2009), was carried out between 35º-39ºS and covered a depth range between 10 to 140 m. The second was part of the Summer Antarctic Campaign 2011 (CAV-III; 2011) that took place around the Antarctic Peninsula, South Shetland and South Orkney Islands (depth range between 67 to 754 m). The last cruise was the final stretch of the Summer Antarctic Campaign 2011 (CAV-IV; 2011), from 39º-55ºS and between 30-140 m depth. As result, 74 stations have been studied, of which 68 were found at least one echinoderm specimen. From the total number of stations, the occurrence percentages for each class were Asteroidea (68%), Echinoidea (64%), Ophiuroidea (55%), Holothuroidea (51%) and Crinoidea (20%). In the campaign M-II, echinoderms were presented in 94% of the sampled stations, being Echinoidea the most frequent (74%). Regarding CAV-III campaign, echinoderms were presented in all the stations sampled; Ophiuroidea was the most representative class in number of stations (100%). The lowest occurrence of echinoderms was found in CAV-IV campaign (82%), where Asteroidea was present in the 73% of the samples, and crinoids were absent. As conclusion, all the echinoderm classes were present in the Antarctic samples, and in 88% of the stations of M-II and CAV-IV, for Argentine Sea. Future projects will be focus on the study of the echinoderms species not yet described, as well as their interaction with other invertebrates, relatively unknown, but with high proportion in these benthic communities.